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Field Reversing the Adams Rite 4510 Latch

4510

Adams Rite 4510 Latch

Although Adams Rite tech support might not want to talk about it*, depending on who you talk to there, the 4510 series latch lock, like its predecessor the 4710, is, in fact, field reversible.  Following are the steps to do so.

First, try to choose a clean work surface in an enclosed space, just in case the springs go flying.

1. Remove the retaining plate screws using a #1 Philips screwdriver.  Place the screws on the work surface where you can find them later.

screws

2. Carefully remove the plate from the back of the lock body that holds the bolt, auxiliary dead latch and latch springs in place.   The latch springs exert tension against this plate, so remove it with care.

3.  Using the tip of the screwdriver, move the locking lever pin so it lines up with the slot in the lock body and gently push the front of the bolt with your thumb.  The bolt, auxiliary dead latch and deadlock arm assembly will slide out of the back of the lock body together.

SlideLatchOut4. Remove the pin that attaches the deadlock arm to the bolt assembly.

See the exploded view of the old 4710 latch below for more detail.  The newer 4510 is similar if not identical to the 4710.

Caution:  There is a spring inside the bolt assembly that actuates the deadlock arm.

5. Remove the deadlock arm and spring.

pin1

6. Turn the latch over and install the deadlock arm and spring on the other side.  You will need to hold the deadlock arm and spring in position. When the spring and all are in position, install the pin.

7.  Slide the bolt assembly into the lock body.

pin9. Place the smaller spring into the auxiliary deadlatch and the larger spring in the bolt.

8.  Slide the auxiliary deadlatch into the lock body.

9.  Install the retaining plate and screws.

 

 

 

 

Detail from discontinued Adams Rite 4710 Latch parts breakdown, from Adams Rite parts book

Detail from discontinued Adams Rite 4710 Latch parts breakdown, from Adams Rite parts book

disassemble

* I recently related this procedure to a locksmith who said she had called Adams Rite tech support who told her the unit is not field reversible. This is understandable because the installation instructions do not discuss reversing the handing.

The Obsolete Mortise Lock

Nothing lasts forever.  Like manufacturers of other mechanical devices, lock companies periodically update their products to be consistent with current technology.  They do this to make better, safer, more reliable products, and also to remain competitive in the market place.

Sometimes these new, updated products are backwards-compatible with older models of the same brand, sometimes not.   In the case of mortise locks I can say with some confidence, mostly not.   One cannot replace a Schlage K series mortise lock body with an L series and expect the trim to work.  The same is true of the newer Sargent 8200 vs. the older 8100 and the Yale 8800 series vs. the previous 8700 series.  As these older locks age and must be replaced these differences can become a problem, since the existing trims and cylinders on site may not be usable with the new lock bodies.  And there are still plenty of these older lock bodies out there.  Case in point, although the Yale 8700 series was discontinued in 2006, one facility I know is filled to the brim with these mortise locks.

Although I foresaw that they would not be able to use the existing trims with their new locks I failed to anticipate that the existing cylinders would also be incompatible.  But they were and here is why.  On the left the cam that works with the Yale 8700 is in the process of being removed from a Medeco small format interchangeable core (SFIC) housing.  In the first picture below, the correct cam has been installed.

DSCN4430DSCN4432

 

 

 

 

 

In the second picture you can see that the new cam is not only thinner than the old cam, it’s also slightly longer.  There is no way that old cam is going to work.  Luckily, on a Medeco SFIC housing the cams are interchangeable, unlike most others on which the cams are permanently attached.


Please visit my friends’ site:

http://www.americanlocksets.com/mortise-locks-c-38_159.html


Now I’m waiting to hear about the other SFIC housings on the job that have their cams staked on. But one cluster at time, eh?

Schlage CO and AD Series Mortise Lock Parts

Schlage AD Series

Schlage AD Series

This just goes to show that there is no substitute for field experience. In the quest to provide the best service to his customer, this locksmith went past my advice and the advice of factory tech support to find the best solution.

The locksmith inquired about a replacement latch for a Schlage CO200MS mortise lock. I called Schlage Tech Support and they said that there were no replacement parts available for that CO-200 Series mortise lock chassis; that the entire mortise chassis had to be replaced for a hefty sum and I relayed this info to the locksmith. The locksmith, however, knew that Schlage advertised that the CO series locksets incorporated the Schlage standard L-series lock chassis “for durability and dependability.” Based on this, the locsksmith took a chance, went to the parts list for the L-Series mortise lock with the same function and ordered the replacement latch. He reports that is identical and works fine.

Good to know! One can assume that many parts from the L Series mortise lock with the same function will work in all AD and CO series mortise lock bodies. Like I said, you learn something new every day.

Thanks for stopping by.


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