You are currently browsing the Door Hardware Genius posts tagged: retrofit


Aluminum Door Latch Electric Strike Retrofit

Adams Rite 4501 Strike – from the Adams Rite web site.

Often we find ourselves involved in someone’s second thoughts about the use of a particular aluminum storefront type opening, wherein someone remembers that, hey, this opening needs access control.  Or, perhaps, the idea of access control comes to the opening later in its life.  In any case, the door company provided their usual solution for the customer’s parameters:  an Adams Rite latch with a lever handle or push paddle and the standard strike shown at right.  Extra credit:  What hand is the strike in the picture?*

From Adams Rite 4901 and 4902 install instructions

Above is a drawing of the prep for the 4901 double-hole strike.  The prep is 4-5/8 x the width of the door frame less 5/32 inch (.15 inches) as shown – or about 1-7/8 inches wide or so, depending on the actual depth of the frame measured from the stop to the edge.

The most common (non-electric) strike that comes with the Adams Rite latch is the 4901 as of this writing.  It was called the 4501 years ago, but it remains mostly the same:  4-5/8 inches tall, with two holes to accommodate left- or right-handed doors.  It comes with a plastic insert to block off the unused hole as shown in the picture of the 4501 strike above.

Common electric strike face plate heights are 4-7/8 inches, 6-7/8 inches , 7-15/16 inches, and 9 inches, and common widths range from 7/8 to 1-7/16 inches.  The problem lies in the differences.  None of these common sizes will fully cover the width of the 4901 prep, and after you’ve installed the strike there are ugly gaps left to fill in the aluminum.   You can use one of the following retrofit solutions to avoid this problem.

Retrofit Solutions

Trine 3458 electric strike, from the Trine web site.

Two companies have led the way in solutions to this very specific and often-occurring problem:  Trine and Adams Rite.  Trine has the quick fix and Adams Rite has the relatively heavy-duty fix.

Several years ago Trine redefined itself into a company of innovative solutions from a company that was much more focused on price point.  They went from being the cheapest guy on the street (though in many cases they still have the best price) to being a great problem-solver.  Case in point, the Trine 3458 electric strike (see pic at left), designed as a drop-in replacement for the Adams Rite 4901 with NO CUTTING.   This is a big deal for installers.

Despite its tiny body, the strike boasts an ANSI Grade 1 rating and 1200 lbs. of holding force.

The downsides:  not voltage selectable without a line conditioner, not field selectable for fail safe/fail secure, and keeper depth is 1/2 inch – fine for use with the Adams Rite 4510 latch which has a 1/2-inch throw, but could be an issue with the Adams Rite 4900 (5/8-inch throw) if the gap between the door and frame is less than the 1/8 inch it should be.

Adams Rite remains the premier manufacturer of locking hardware for aluminum storefront doors and frames as it has been for decades.  They have consistently worked to improve product quality and performance and they have succeeded.

FPK45 Retrofit Kit by Adams Rite

The Adams Rite solution to the 4901 retrofit problem is actually two-fold because it applies to two very different models of strikes:  the 7100 and the 7400.  For the 7100 series, Adams Rite offers the FPK45-00 face plate kit, and for the 7400 series they offer the FPK7445 face plate kit.  Installation of either one is largely the same:  enlarging the prep on the top and the bottom, and keeping the bottom screw mounting tab.

At right you can see the overall dimensions of the FPK7445 or FPK45 and how it aligns with the 4901 (or 4501) strike.  The mission is to line up the keeper of the electric strike to the active hole of the 4901.  You can see that enlarging the prep represents a significant amount of work.  You might well ask, “Why would I do this?”

First, as I mentioned, if you have a 4900 latch in the door and/or no gap between door and frame, you are going to want a deeper keeper than the Trine.  Like the Trine, the Adams Rite are also ANSI Grade 1 burglary resistant but offer a slightly higher holding force of 1500 lbs.  If you do not know the voltage in advance, the 7400 series is completely field selectable for a number of popular voltages – although one can get the Trine LC-100 line conditioner with the Trine strike and accomplish much the same thing.  Both the 7400 and 7100 are field selectable for fail safe or fail secure operation whereas the Trine are not.

In the industry there remains a lot of loyalty to the 7100 series.  In its time, the 7100 was a revolution in design and remains one of the most reliable and repairable electric strikes on the market today.





*The 4501 strike in the picture is left hand, or right hand reverse.

 

locksnsafescom

Your source for quality security products with superior service!

The Wrap-Around Door Reinforcer

4CW2A wrap-around door reinforcer is a metal sleeve that slides over the door at the lock prep to conceal damage and/or reinforce the door.  They are a quick and handy solution when wood doors are damaged by forced entry and are often installed to strengthen new wooden doors against forced entry attempts.

In my experience a wrap does not really deter forced entry, but it does limit the damage done to the door.   I have found that when wood doors equipped with wrap around door reinforcers are burglarized, often only the wrap and the lock need replacing, not the whole door.   As with all door security hardware, if your lock is installed in a wrap-around door reinforcer and your neighbor’s lock is not, a would-be burglar may choose to break into your neighbor’s place instead of yours; however, this hypothesis is dependent on the highly dubious notion that a burglar is behaving rationally.  If the person were behaving rationally they would not risk their freedom and personal safety breaking into to somebody’s home to steal  their iPad or PC and selling it for chump change to their drug dealer.

Another benefit to using wrap-arounds is that they can act as a drill guide for lock installation.  Be careful, however, not to let the hole saw chew up the wrap.  Also, especially with stainless steel wraps, be sure not to let your drill bind up with the metal at high speed.  Injury would be likely.

Wraps are typically used on wooden doors, and while it is possible to use them on hollow metal doors, they never seem to fit quite right without a fight.  It seems that hollow metal doors measure exactly 1-3/4 inches thick whereas wood doors tend to measure closer to 1-11/16 inches.  Variations in door thickness affect the way a wrap will fit (or not fit) on a door.

A wide variety of wrap-arounds have been created to accommodate various locks and conditions.  Don Jo Manufacturing currently carries the largest assortment, and if a new kind of lock by a major manufacturer emerges, they are pretty quick to design a wrap for it.  To get the right borewrap for your application you need to know:

  • Door thickness
  • Size of the wrap you want
  • Diameter of the lock bore
  • Backset
  • Finish
  • Through-bolt holes (yes or no)

(see illustration)

Standard door thicknesses for wraps are 1-3/8 inches and 1-3/4 inches.  Some models of wraps are available thicker doors.   Wraps come in a variety of heights, but height is usually determined by the kind of lock the wrap is designed for and the backset.  See the illustration for bore, through-bolt hole and backset details.

For other wraps you may need other dimensions.  For example, Don Jo makes a number of wrap-arounds for interconnected locks and these (naturally) have two bores cut in instead of one.   If you need a wrap for a mortise lock you may have to change the trim on the lock to make it work, or you might have to drill lever, cylinder and thumb turn holes into a blank wrap to customize it to the lock you have.  See my warning about hole saws and stainless steel above.  I earned myself sprained fingers that way once.

I used to joke about certain doors that they could use a door sized wrap.  Then some enterprising individual actually brought one by.  The idea didn’t go anywhere, as far as I know, but it was a good concept:  one wrap covered the door completely in sheet metal and another covered the frame.  Still, at that point why would one just buy a hollow metal door and frame?

And that about wraps it up.


Tags